Many Yeshiva University Museum exhibitions offer online opportunities for learning beyond the galleries.

On view at the Museum in 2010, 16 mm Postcards: Home Movies of American Jewish Visitors to 1930s Poland brought to life the landscape of people in Poland through the amateur movies of immigrant American Jews who traveled "back home" to visit their families, friends, and former communities in the 1920s and 1930s.

An exceptional collection of manuscripts and printed books on view at the Museum in 2011, A Journey through Jewish Worlds: Highlights of the Braginsky Collection of Hebrew Manuscripts and Printed Books provides an overview of seven centuries of Jewish creativity and artistry, and features beautifully ornamented legal and liturgical manuscripts, decorated marriage contracts and illustrated scrolls of the Book of Esther, many with richly crafted cases made from precious metals or carved wood.

Motivated by his desire to preserve a Jewish heritage devastated by the Holocaust, Max Stern, founder of Hartz Mountain pet products, built a collection of over 400 Judaica items. Many of these objects are now in The Max Stern Collection of Judaica at Yeshiva University Museum.

The history of American fashion - from Gold Rush-era to Hollywood-inspired glamour and the evolution of the American workplace with its careful balance between management and organized labor, were explored in the 2005-2006 exhibition A Perfect Fit : The Garment Industry and American Jewry. Costumes, accessories, industrial equipment, photographs, artwork, archival materials, and audiovisual installations illustrated the impact of the garment industry on American culture and its role in the formation of American Jewish history. A Perfect Fit brought to life the story of how American Jews built an industry stretching from Seventh Avenue to every corner of the nation.

A fascinating exploration into the world of Talmud study, Printing The Talmud: From Bomberg to Schottenstein illustrated how technological advances - the invention of the printing press more than 500 years ago and the impact of computers in recent decades - have transformed the ancient discipline of Talmud study into an accessible pursuit available to all. The exhibition featured outstanding examples of early Talmud manuscripts and rare examples of early printed volumes, including one of the few extant complete sets of the printed edition of the famed Bomberg Talmud.